Overview

Our Intellectual Property & Technology (IP&T) team can provides service across the complete suite of intellectual property rights (IPR), including contentious matters.

With experience across a diverse range of industries including pharmaceutical, engineering, media, financial services, mining, IT and biotechnology, we help our clients create, protect and commercialise their IPR, and avoid unauthorised use of third party rights.

Our track record includes advice to, and representation of, a wide range of clients from start-ups to large international household names, who value our ability to see the 'big picture'.

We can help with:

Drawing on a global network of professional associates, our IP&T experts can assist you across Australia and throughout the world.

Contacts
Special Counsel
T +61 7 3100 5023
 
Intellectual Property awards and rankings

Our IPT&C team have received many accolades for their expertise in Intellectual Property.

DibbsBarker ranked in Tier 3.
DibbsBarker ranked in Band 5, Scott Sloan ranked Band 4 and Rob McInnes noted.
DibbsBarker ranked in both ‘Enforcement & Litigation’ and ‘Prosecution & Strategy’ categories.

DibbsBarker listed as recommended in ‘Transactions’ ranked bronze in ‘Litigation’.

DibbsBarker listed as a notable firm in both patent contentious and trade mark contentious.
 
 
Recent News and Publications
17 May 2017
The recent decision in Universal Music Australia Pty Limited v TPG Internet Pty Ltd [2017] FCA 435 (TPG Internet) heralds another win for copyright owners and exclusive licensees protecting their rights from pirate websites operating outside Australia.
12 May 2017
Under the National Health Act 1953, medicines listed on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) are assigned to either Formulary 1 (F1) (usually single brand medicines) or to Formulary 2 (F2) (usually medicines that have multiple brands, or are in a therapeutic group with other medicines with multiple brands).
20 Apr 2017
In a recent appeal case heard by the Full Court of the Federal Court of Australia, the Court has confirmed that merely making an application for listing of a patented pharmaceutical product on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) would not infringe the patent.