publications

Our team regularly produces articles and updates on legal developments and the implications for clients. You can subscribe to our updates or view the latest articles below.

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Recent publications

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1084 publication(s) found Page 1 of 55
Date: 18 Jan 2018
The December 2017 edition of the In House Counsel Newsletter (a LexisNexis publication) contains an article by Maree Skinner entitled ‘Considerations for employers in the "gig economy" era'.
Date: 16 Jan 2018
On 2 January, whilst many us were all contemplating ways to use up the very last of the Christmas ham, the directors of the Belmont Sportmans Club Co-operative Ltd (Club) were asking Justice Black of the NSW Supreme Court to appoint John Morgan and Geoff Davis as voluntary administrators to the Club.
Date: 13 Dec 2017
The silly season is upon us and with that comes a greater emphasis on just ‘getting the deal done’ before year’s end. While remedies are available to contractual parties where mistakes have been made in finalising deal documentation, they can be costly to resolve. Proper care therefore needs to be taken to ensure that final documents truly reflect what was agreed between the parties.
Date: 06 Dec 2017
The Privacy Amendment (Notifiable Data Breaches) Act 2017 (Cth) applies to government agencies, private sector organisations with annual turnovers over $3m, and all organisations handling health information or involved in credit reporting.
Date: 30 Nov 2017
Consider the position of the buyer of a business, entering into a sale agreement with the seller. The seller will make various representations about the business that will be underpinned with warranties and indemnities, all for the purpose of giving the buyer comfort about what they are purchasing.
Date: 29 Nov 2017
The newly enacted Treasury Laws Amendment (2017 Enterprise Incentives No.2) Act (Cth) 2017 (Safe Harbour Legislation) is primarily concerned with giving company directors breathing space in circumstances where a restructure is being pursued.
Date: 16 Nov 2017
The October 2017 edition of the Australian Banking & Finance Law Bulletin (a LexisNexis publication) contains an article by Ben Shaw and Morgan Stack entitled ‘Charging clauses: is near enough still good enough?'
Date: 15 Nov 2017
Contracting arrangements have become increasingly common as the ‘gig economy’ has gained momentum and the composition of Australia’s workforce has shifted, with many workers seeking greater autonomy and flexibility. It’s important for employers to ensure contractors are engaged appropriately to avoid the risk of claims from workers or prosecution by regulators.
Date: 09 Nov 2017
The October 2017 edition of the Australian Banking & Finance Law Bulletin (a LexisNexis publication) contains an article by Scott Guthrie entitled ‘PPSA - what difference does it make?'
Date: 30 Oct 2017
Building owners incur substantial costs arising from their ownership, commonly referred to as ‘outgoings’. In the landlord and tenant context, outgoings are often a topic of debate in lease negotiations. Invariably, landlords will want to pass on the costs of outgoings to their tenants.
Date: 26 Oct 2017
A central theme in Australia’s safe harbour legislation is a “better outcome for the company”. Achieving a “better outcome” is the ultimate aim of the course of action to be taken by directors to enliven the protection afforded by the safe harbour regime. Conversely, directors will be outside safe harbour once that course of action ceases to be reasonably likely to achieve that “better outcome”.
Date: 23 Oct 2017
An initial public offering (IPO) can be an attractive way for some companies to facilitate the continued growth of their business. But it’s a significant undertaking that won’t be appropriate in every case, and a listing on the ASX brings about a new regulatory environment to comply with, including continuous disclosure obligations. A decision to conduct an IPO and list on the ASX should be carefully considered.
Date: 20 Oct 2017
Earlier this year, the Federal Government announced that it would introduce a new external dispute resolution framework for the banking and finance sector through the establishment of a 'one-stop shop' for all financial complaints, the Australian Financial Complaints Authority (AFCA).
Date: 18 Oct 2017
The sole shareholder of two companies has failed in attempting to challenge the validity of the appointment of administrators to those companies.
Date: 12 Oct 2017
Various news outlets have now reported far and wide that, after becoming aware of a pop-up bar said to have incorporated various themes from the Stranger Things series, Netflix’s IP counsel sent the bar’s owners a cease and desist letter.
Date: 03 Oct 2017
In our Safe Harbour Wheelhouse publication series we will consider how the new laws are likely to play out and impact key stakeholders once companies begin relying on the new provisions in months and years to come. In this first update, we look at some of the issues that directors and unsecured creditors will need to consider given the Corporations Act’s silence about whether or not a restructure plan should be disclosed to creditors.
Date: 29 Sep 2017
After months of anticipation, speculation and some controversy, the Turnbull government’s crowd-sourced funding (CSF) regime for unlisted public companies came into effect today, 29 September 2017.
Date: 27 Sep 2017
Landlords and tenants of retail premises take note – there has been significant change to the regulation of trading hours for retail shops in Queensland, with the Trading (Allowable Hours) Act (Qld) 1990 (Act) having had its first major overhaul in more than 20 years.
Date: 22 Sep 2017
What do investors consider most closely when evaluating an opportunity to invest in an initial public offering (IPO)? Do institutional and retail investors place different weight on different sources of information? How well do retail investors really understand prospectuses?
Date: 14 Sep 2017
When shareholders in a company fall out, they sometimes allege that the company’s affairs have been managed in an unfair or oppressive way. Parties to a joint venture gone sour, warring directors, or families mired in disputes over the direction, management, succession and future control of a business are the typical parties to a shareholder dispute, commonly known as an ‘oppression proceeding’.